Journal of Genetic Genealogy

Enriching our world
through citizen science.

1 Journal of Genetic Genealogy An independent online journal that publishes original work involving genealogical applications of genetic test results.
2 News for and by a world-wide community JoGG accepts submissions in the form of Brief Communications, Scientific Reports, Case Studies, Review Articles and Letters to the Editor.
3 Y-DNA Testing of the Fox Paper Trail >Simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. it has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged.

About JoGG


About the Journal of Genetic Genealogy

The Journal of Genetic Genealogy (JoGG) is exclusively an online journal. The entire content of the Journal will be published quarterly on the World Wide Web at www.jogg.info. It is possible that JoGG will have a minimal printed edition for certain libraries. Previous issues of the Journal will remain on the web site. Ownership and control of the journal presently reside with the editorial board.

JoGG invites papers presenting original work involving techniques for analyzing the results of genetic testing that will prove of wide use among the genealogical community. The main emphasis of this journal will be to present a forum for articles that may not be appropriate for other established genetics journals since they may be based on datasets in which a statistically random sample cannot be guaranteed (i.e. surname studies). Articles on individual surname studies are welcomed if they illustrate an unusual success story, present a new method of analysis, or would otherwise be of general interest to the genealogical community. Other topics might include insights into mutation rates, geographic patterns in genetic data, information that help to characterize haplogroups, and studies involving mtDNA. Beyond Y chromosomal and mtDNA topics, we encourage articles on new tools that may include X chromosome markers, and ancestrally informative autosomal markers.

These guidelines are not definitive. Correspondence with the editor is heartily welcomed concerning any topic of genetic genealogy an author thinks may be appropriate for JoGG.

Opportunities for Publishing in JoGG

While the quality of the datasets may be uncertain, genetic genealogists have access to larger datasets with more markers than are usually available to genetic researchers. Therefore, there is the opportunity to identify patterns in genetic data before long before they appear in other established genetics journals. The journal is likely to have audience in both communities.

For detailed information on format and style for articles, click on Instructions for Authors.

Aims and Scope

The Journal of Genetic Genealogy (JoGG) is an independent online journal that publishes original work involving genealogical applications of genetic test results. Issues are compiled at www.jogg.info, with individual articles available as pre-prints once the review process has been completed. At present, there are no costs to publish in JoGG nor to access the articles on-line. Authors retain copyright to their work but license it to JoGG pursuant to the Creative Commons agreement.

JoGG invites papers presenting original analyses of genetic or genomic data that will prove valuable to the genealogical community. Topics include, but are not limited to, autosomal DNA inheritance, surname DNA projects, geographic patterns in genetic data, phylogenetic analyses, haplogroup categorization, and mutation rates. Genetic genealogists have access to larger datasets with more markers than are usually available to genetic researchers, although the sampling may not be random (e.g., surname studies) and the datasets may vary in quality (e.g., inconsistent marker sampling). Therefore, JoGG is a forum for research that may not fall within the scope of more genetically oriented journals. The journal is likely to have an audience in both the lay and academic communities. The Editorial Board encourages comment on JoGG’s scope, content, and format.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License. Commercial use is not allowed without permission. The information is free for personal users and researchers; attribution is required on derivative works and a share-alike license applies. All rights reserved.

Leah Larkin, Ph.D.
Editor-In-Chief

Email: jogg (at) isogg.org

Leah Larkin earned her bachelor's degree from Swarthmore College and her Ph.D. in 2002 from the University of Texas at Austin. Her dissertation work relied heavily on phylogenetic analysis, which is applicable to both ySNP and mtDNA studies in genealogy. She left academia after several years as a professor to become a freelance scientific editor. Her genealogical interests focus on using autosomal DNA in endogamous groups, especially through the Cajun Cousins project.

Past Editors

Blaine T. Bettinger, PhD, JD

Email: Blaine_5 (at) hotmail.com

Blaine Bettinger is a graduate of the Syracuse University College of Law where he studied intellectual property law. He received his Ph.D. in biochemistry and molecular biology from SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, NY in 2006. He is currently the coordinator of the Bettinger surname DNA project and blogs at The Genetic Genealogist.

T. Whit Athey, PhD

Email: athey (at) hprg.com

Whit Athey is a retired physicist whose working career was primarily at the Food and Drug Administration where he was the chief of one of the medical device labs. He received his doctorate in physics and biochemistry at Tufts University, and undergraduate (engineering) and masters (math) degrees at Auburn University. For several years during the 1980s, he also taught one course each semester in the Electrical Engineering Department of the University of Maryland. Besides his interest in genetic genealogy, he is an amateur astronomer and has his own small observatory near his home in Brookeville, MD.

Editorial Board

Leah Larkin, PhD

Email: jogg (at) isogg.org

Leah Larkin earned her bachelor's degree from Swarthmore College and her PhD in 2002 from the University of Texas at Austin. Her dissertation work relied heavily on phylogenetic analysis, which is applicable to both ySNP and mtDNA studies in genealogy. She left academia after several years as a professor to become a freelance scientific editor. Her genealogical interests focus on using autosomal DNA in endogamous groups, especially through the Cajun Cousins project.

Turi King, PhD

Dr. King's PhD thesis topic was The relationship between British surnames and Y-chromosomal haplotypes and she is also co-author (with George Redmonds and David Hey) of the book Surnames, DNA and Family History. Dr. King is currently a Research Fellow in the Department of Genetics and the School of Historical Studies at the University of Leicester, where she is the project manager for an interdisciplinary project The Impact of Diasporas on the Making of Britain. Turi has worked on the Y chromosome since 1996 and has concentrated on surnames, the Y chromosome and genetic genealogy (among other studies) for over ten years. More details about her background and interests can be found at http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/genetics/people/king/turi.

Doug McDonald, PhD

Email: Mcdonald (at) scs.uiuc.edu

J. D. McDonald is Professor of Chemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His current research interests include studies of the folding of single protein molecules. He is the assistant administrator and data custodian of the Clan Donald DNA Project.

Steven C. Perkins, Jd MLL

Email: sperkins (at) gmail.com

Steven C. Perkins is Coordinator of Reference Services at the University of Houston M.D. Anderson Library. He has a JD from the University of Cincinnati and an MLL degree from the University of Denver. He is an avid genealogist and is running eight Y chromosome surname studies.

David A. Pike, PhD

Email: dapike (at) mun.ca

David Pike is a Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science at Memorial University of Newfoundland. He obtained his PhD in 1996 from Auburn University and his BMath in 1992 from the University of Waterloo.


Dr. Pike has been voluntarily coordinating the Pike Surname DNA Project since its inception in 2004. His interests in genetic genealogy also include mitochondrial DNA (especially mtDNA Haplogroup T), Y-DNA Haplogroup R-Z253, and autosomal DNA analysis.

Ann Turner, MD

Email: dnacousins (at) gmail.com

Ann Turner is the founder of the GENEALOGY-DNA mailing list at RootsWeb and the co-author (with Megan Smolenyak) of "Trace Your Roots with DNA: Using Genetic Tests to Explore Your Family Tree." She received her undergraduate degree in biology in 1964 and her M.D. from Stanford University in 1970. In recent years, she developed software for neuropsychological testing and wrote utility programs for the PAF genealogy program. One of these utilities provided a way to split out all people in a database who were related via their mitochondrial DNA, six years before mtDNA tests were commercially available. The inspiration for this feature came from the (then) forward-looking predictions of Dr. Thomas Roderick.